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RAO BULLETIN 15 March 2018

Bulletin 180315 (PDF Edition)-1

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VETERAN LEGISLATION

In each chamber of Congress, four forms of legislative measures may be introduced or submitted, and acted upon. These include bills, joint resolutions, concurrent resolutions, and simple resolutions. Resolutions are not laws but rather the statements of intent or declarations that affect the operations of Congress

  •  Joint resolutions are legislative measure that requires approval by the Senate and the House and is presented to the President for his approval or disapproval, in exactly the same case as a bill.
  • Concurrent resolutions are legislative measures adopted by both houses of a bicameral legislature that lacks the force of law (is non-binding) and does not require the approval of the chief executive (president). Concurrent resolutions are typically adopted to regulate the internal affairs of the legislature that adopted it, or for other purposes where authority of law is not necessary-such as awards or recognitions
  • Simple resolutions are used to delegate official internal Congressional business.

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VETERAN LEGISLATION

US-DeptOfVeteransAffairs-Seal-15-AugIn each chamber of Congress, four forms of legislative measures may be introduced or submitted, and acted upon. These include bills, joint resolutions, concurrent resolutions, and simple resolutions. Resolutions are not laws but rather the statements of intent or declarations that affect the operations of Congress. Joint resolutions are legislative measure that requires approval by the Senate and the House and is presented to the President for his approval or disapproval, in exactly the same case as a bill. Concurrent resolutions are legislative measures adopted by both houses of a bicameral legislature that lacks the force of law (is non-binding) and does not require the approval of the chief executive (president). Concurrent resolutions are typically adopted to regulate the internal affairs of the legislature that adopted it, or for other purposes where authority of law is not necessary-such as awards or recognitions.  Simple resolutions are used to delegate official internal Congressional business.   view or download full.pdf

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RAO BULLETIN

There are two concurrent receipt programs available to Navy and Marine Corps retirees who have VA-rated disabilities.  They are the Concurrent Retirement and Disability Payments (CRDP) program and the Combat-Related Special Compensation (CRSC) program.  Retirees who receive VA disability payments have their retired pay “offset” (reduced) by the amount of VA pay.  These concurrent receipt programs “restore” some or all of that retired pay.  The Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) calculate and pay monthly CRDP and CRSC compensation. It is highly recommended that you have a myPay account set up with DFAS to manage your retired pay.

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VETERAN LEGISLATION

In each chamber of Congress, four forms of legislative measures may be introduced or submitted, and acted upon. These include bills, joint resolutions, concurrent resolutions, and simple resolutions. Resolutions are not laws but rather the statements of intent or
declarations that affect the operations of Congress

  • Joint resolutions are legislative measure that requires approval by the Senate and the House and is presented to the President for his approval or disapproval, in exactly the same case as a bill.
  • Concurrent resolutions are legislative measures adopted by both houses of a bicameral legislature that lacks the force of law (is non-binding) and does not require the approval of the chief executive (president). Concurrent resolutions are typically adopted to regulate the internal affairs of the legislature that adopted it, or for other purposes where authority of law is not necessary-such as awards or recognitions
  • Simple resolutions are used to delegate official internal Congressional business.

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RAO BULLETIN

The United States isn’t trying to build a military force of centenarians. It just seems that way after the Selective Service System mistakenly sent notices to more than 14,000 Pennsylvania men born between 1893 and 1897, ordering them to register for the nation’s military draft and warning that failure to do so is “punishable by a fine and imprisonment.” The agency realized the error when it began receiving calls from bewildered relatives last week. Chuck Huey, 73, of Kingston, said he got a notice addressed to his late grandfather Bert Huey, a World War I veteran who was born in 1894 and died in 1995 at age 100. “I said, ‘Geez, what the hell is this about?’ It said he was subject to heavy fines and imprisonment if he didn’t sign up for the draft board,” he said. “We were just totally dumbfounded.”

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Washington State Veteran’s Benefits & Discounts

The state of Washington provides veteran benefits. This section offers a brief description of each of the following benefits.

  • Veteran Housing Benefits
  • Veteran Financial Assistance Benefits
  • Other State Veteran Benefits

Washington Veteran Housing Programs

Homeless Veterans Program

WDVA provides outreach services for homeless veterans in Puget Sound. These services are designed to assist homeless veterans to become employable and reintegrated back into the labor market. Services include needs assessments, enrollments in appropriate programs, shelter and transitional housing placements, employment and training support services.

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Wyoming State Veteran’s Benefits & Discounts

The state of Wyoming provides veteran benefits. This section offers a brief description of each of the following benefits.

  • Veteran Housing Benefits
  • Veteran Financial Assistance Benefits
  • Veteran Employment Benefits
  • Veteran Education Benefits
  • Other State Veteran Benefits

 Wyoming Veteran Housing Programs

 Veterans’ Home of Wyoming 

This home is located on the historic site of Fort McKinney at 700 Veterans Ln, Buffalo. It was built in the summer and fall of 1878. The home was established in 1895 with the first member being housed at Fort D. A. Russell (now F.E. Warren AFB) in Cheyenne, Wyoming. The home and its resident were transferred from Cheyenne to the home’s present location in 1903. It is located three miles west of Buffalo, one-half mile south of Highway 16, at the base of the majestic Big Horn Mountains. Clear Creek from the Big Horns runs through the center of the area surrounding the home and supplies the fresh water for the resident trout pond.

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RAO BULLETIN

DoD Benefit Cuts Update 42  ►   Are Benefits Extremely Generous?

Retired Army Lt. Col. Tom Slear has touched the third rail of military and veterans’ issues with an opinion piece arguing that a “very small decrease in pay” for military retirees would be reasonable, considering the need for the U.S. government to cut spending. Slear wrote in the Washington Post that his retirement benefits are extremely generous, especially considering that he was never deployed to a combat zone. He pays $550 a year for family medical insurance under Tricare, while the average family paid $4,565 in 2013 for private health insurance. “Budget deficits are tilting America toward financial malaise,” Slear wrote in the June 6 piece in the Washington Post. “Our elected representatives will have to summon the courage to confront the costs of benefits and entitlements and make hard choices. Some ‘no’ votes when it comes to our service members and, in particular, military retirees will be necessary. We can afford it.”

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Wham Paymaster Robbery

In April 1889, Special Order 37 directed all paymasters in the District of Arizona to pay troops mustered as of April 30. Major Joseph Washington Wham, a U.S. Army paymaster, was assigned Fort Bowie, Fort Grant, Fort Thomas, Fort Apache and Camp San Carlos. Wham and his clerk, William T. Gibbon, met a train carrying the payroll in Wilcox on May 8. The paymaster performed his duties at Fort Bowie on May 9 and at Fort Grant on May 10.

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RAO BULLETIN

Fresh off of the failure of the joint Department of Defense/Department of Veterans’ Affairs electronic health record program, the Pentagon is preparing an $11 billion contract to overhaul its own electronic health records. This would be the biggest federal IT job since last fall’s HealthCare.gov rollout. Many outside observers are concerned that this could become another failed effort The Chief Information Officer at the Office of Management and Budget has warned that a giant problem-solving contract to a single vendor for several years is a common “boondogglish characteristic” of IT procurement that typically ends in failure, Politico.com reported. People familiar with the defense contract stressed the industry’s readiness to take it on. HealthCare.gov was a unique project bedeviled by a complex mixture of political strife, balkanized vendors, a short time frame and a customized, first-of-its-kind tech system, they said. Andy Maner, managing partner of IBM U.S. Federal, plans to bid on the contract and to put its Watson supercomputer to use solving health care problems for the DOD project. The Pentagon hopes to issue the contract by early summer 2015, rolling out the health records system region by region in 2016 with a goal to finish by 2023.

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Veteran Updates

In each chamber of Congress, four forms of legislative measures may be introduced or submitted, and acted upon. These include bills, joint resolutions, concurrent resolutions, and simple resolutions. Resolutions are not laws but rather the statements of intent or
declarations that affect the operations of Congress:-

  • Joint resolutions are legislative measure that requires approval by the Senate and the House and is presented to the President for his approval or disapproval, in exactly the same case as a bill.
  • Concurrent resolutions are legislative measures adopted by both houses of a bicameral legislature that lacks the force of law (is non-binding) and does not require the approval of the chief executive (president). Concurrent resolutions are typically adopted to regulate the internal affairs of the legislature that adopted it, or for other purposes where authority of law is not necessary-such as awards or recognitions
  • Simple resolutions are used to delegate official internal Congressional business.

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U.S. Soldier’s Home & Lincoln

It’s typical for the president to get away from the White House from time to time, but how many presidents relocated to a U.S. Soldier’s Home or lived on the grounds of a military cemetery? Some of our earlier presidents had homes in close proximity to the Capitol, which made trips home practical, even without the means we have today. But what did our early presidents do when they were not from the area? President Lincoln’s escape from the White House was not a ranch or beach house, but rather a simple cottage located on the grounds of the U.S. Soldier’s Home, three miles north of the Capitol. It subsequently became known as President Lincoln’s Cottage’. The house and its accompanying 200 acres were donated to the federal government in 1851, by local bank owner George Washington Riggs Jr., for the purpose of establishing the nation’s first Soldier’s Home, and it remains in service to our Veterans today.

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Veteran Legislation

At present 8,000 bills and resolutions containing 3,586 amendments have been introduced the United States Congress. Of those, on average only about 5% will become law. They must be enacted before the end of the 2013-2015 session of the 113th Congress sometime before 3 JAN 2015. To date only 98 laws, of which only a few were veteran related, have been passed by both chambers and sent to the President for signature of which he has vetoed none. This is only 1.46% of all introduced bills being signed into law. Thus the 113th Congress is often referred to as a “Do-nothing Congress”.

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RAO BULLETIN

Crowds that shop daily in base commissaries and exchanges perhaps are oblivious to a confluence of forces threatening to dismantle their multi-billion dollar resale systems. Thomas C. Shull, chief executive officer of the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is not, which helps to explain his 17 MAR memo proposing a merger of commissaries with exchanges to try to save both. While Department of Defense civilian and military leaders testify that base grocery stores can survive 20 percent higher prices, and that base department stores can weather falling sales, behind the scenes the systems’ top managers are sounding alarms. At risk are the prized discounts on groceries and merchandise the military has enjoyed for decades. Industry sources contend the threats have never been more real, more numerous or potentially more destructive.

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